LOADING

Type to search

Storm on April 12 may be one of the worst in 10 years, DeKalb Emergency Management Agency says

Avondale Estates Business COVID-19 Crime and public safety Decatur Kirkwood Metro ATL Tucker

Storm on April 12 may be one of the worst in 10 years, DeKalb Emergency Management Agency says

Photo obtained via Wikimedia Commons
Share

 

DeKalb County, GA – The DeKalb County Emergency Management Agency is warning residents to take seriously a storm headed to the county this evening, April 12.

The warning was relayed to residents by the city of Decatur.

“This evening and into Monday there will be a Tornado and Severe Wind Threat for much of the Southeast US, including all of North and Central Georgia,” the county EMA says. “Severe thunderstorm outbreaks are likely. This is likely to be a multiple round event, persisting Sunday night and into Monday morning.”

Tornadoes, damaging winds, hail and heavy rain with localized flooding are possible.

The alert from the EMA says, in all caps, “THE POTENTIAL EXISTS FOR THIS TO BE ONE OF THE MORE SIGNIFICANT SEVERE WEATHER OUTBREAKS ACROSS THE SOUTHEAST OVER THE PAST DECADE.”

Here is the full EMA alert, provided by the city of Decatur:

We want to make sure you don’t miss this important severe weather update from the DeKalb Emergency Management Agency:

This evening and into Monday there will be a Tornado and Severe Wind Threat for much of the Southeast US, including all of North and Central Georgia. Severe thunderstorm outbreaks are likely. This is likely to be a multiple round event, persisting Sunday night and into Monday morning. The main impacts include:

– Tornadoes (Strong/long-track tornadoes possible)

– Damaging Winds (could down trees/powerlines)

– Hail

– Heavy Rain (localized flooding possible)

Showers and thunderstorms will start to overspread Georgia later in the morning on Easter Sunday as a strong storm system traverses the southeastern U.S. This initial wave (morning & afternoon) is not expected to pose a severe weather threat. The much more significant weather will likely hold off until the evening before moving into Georgia. The atmosphere will be primed for a severe weather outbreak across the Southeast on Sunday.

The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) continues to have much of Georgia in an Enhanced Risk (3 out of 5 on their scale) for severe weather for Sunday afternoon through Monday morning. SPC also continues to advertise a rare Moderate Risk for severe weather over much of Mississippi and Alabama on Sunday.

THE POTENTIAL EXISTS FOR THIS TO BE ONE OF THE MORE SIGNIFICANT SEVERE WEATHER OUTBREAKS ACROSS THE SOUTHEAST OVER THE PAST DECADE.

Any strong to severe thunderstorms that move through Georgia on Sunday PM/Monday AM have the potential to produce damaging thunderstorm winds, large hail, and strong, potentially long-track tornadoes. With potentially 2-3 inches of rainfall over North Georgia on Sunday, flash flooding will also remain a possibility. The Weather Prediction Center continues to advertise a Moderate Risk (3 out of 4 on their scale) for excessive rainfall leading to flash flooding over far North Georgia on Sunday.

The main cold front will move through Georgia later in the morning on Monday, ending the threat for severe thunderstorms. The front will stall along the Southeast coast on Monday, keeping a chance for showers and thunderstorms in South Georgia through Tuesday and Wednesday. Otherwise, dry and cool weather will dominate over Georgia for all of this upcoming week and weekend.

Here are ways you can get prepared now:

– Keep updated on the latest weather by tuning in to your local weather channel and downloading a weather notification app so that it will notify you while you’re sleeping as the strongest part of the storm will occur overnight and early morning.

– Sign up for the City’s Smart911 notification system to receive emergency weather alerts should the city’s boundaries be included in a storm predicting polygon.

– Determine a safe place to shelter in the event of a tornado. Look around your place for helmets, pillows, e.g. anything you can use to protect your head in the event of flying objects in high winds.

– Have a plan for where you will sleep Sunday night. Overnight tornadoes are particularly dangerous because they catch people unaware and in upstairs bedrooms. As always, it’s good to be on the lowest floor of a house since winds are less strong near the surface.

– Charge your devices, including smartphones, laptops, etc. now, and leave them charging.  Widespread power outages are expected across our region, and it’s highly likely that this will be a 2-3 round severe weather event.

If you appreciate our work on this story, please become a paying supporter. For as little as $3 a month, you can help us keep you in the loop about your community. To become a supporter, click here

Want Decaturish delivered to your inbox every day? Sign up for our free newsletter by clicking here

Decaturish needs your support!

Help us provide you with free, quality local news. Become a Decaturish.com supporter today

To chip in $3 a month, click here.

To chip in $6 a month, click here.

To chip in $60 a year, click here.
* Decaturish.com is not a 501-c-3 organization. Support of Decaturish goes toward our newsgathering efforts. Decaturish does not have a print edition.
close-link